#GrammarTrivia: A Review on Degrees of Comparison

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Hi fellas, how are you today? Hope you are as great as I am. Did you still remember that last Thursday we had #EngQuiz? I noticed that many of you made small errors in comparative sentences. Therefore, I dedicate tonight session for brushing up your memories on comparative sentences.

Making a comparative sentence is easy, I swear. LOL. Yet based on my observation last week, there is one thing that you need to pay attention to.

Make sure that in your sentence you have two equal entities being compared. #GrammarTrivia

See the example from last week:

“The pants I bought yesterday were costlier than last year.” (sentence 1.1)

There is one mistake in the aforementioned sentence. If you see sentence 1.1, the objects compared are actually not equal. The sentence is in fact comparing two unequal entities, namely (1) the pants and (2) last year.

Meanwhile, if you see carefully, you are supposed to have the comparison of pants, two different pants. And if you break down the sentence, you will have two sentences, they are:

  1. The pants I bought yesterday were costlier.
  2. The pants I bought last year.

Therefore, the correct sentence is…

“The pants I bought yesterday were costlier than the pants I bought last year.”

or…

“The pants I bought yesterday were costlier than those I bought last year.”

See another example:

  1. The language topic today is much easier.
  2. The language topic yesterday was easy.

The correct comparative sentence is…

“The language topic today is much easier than it was yesterday.”

NOT

“The language topic today is much easier than yesterday.” –> This is wrooong!

Why is it wrong? Because the sentence compares two unequal entities; they are ‘the language topic’ and ‘yesterday.’ while you are supposed to compare ‘the language topic today’ and ‘the language topic yesterday.’

That’s all the information that I can give tonight. I hope it helps! Oh ya, you can also find another discussion on degrees of comparison in our blog. See here #EngClass: Degrees of Comparison for your further resource. See you next time!

 

 

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Compiled and written by @wisznu at @EnglishTips4u on November 26, 2015

picture: http://www.wemustignitethiscouch.com

 

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