#IOTW: Idioms related to ‘tea’

I got a bit inspired with “tea” today. Having lived in Britain, the idiom related to “tea” is very commonly used. So fellas, do you know any idioms that use the word “tea” the drink?

“Not for all the tea in China” – @LiaSafi3

“Watching heavy metal concert is not my cup of tea.” – @Tuwix

“My cup of tea”

Has anyone heard someone saying like, “Football is not my cup of tea.” Hmmm, so does that mean football is a cup of tea?

“I had heard “not my cup of tea” but I don’t understand the meaning of it…” – @Wesli_S

So, “cup of tea” here refers to “preference” (B.Indo: kesukaan)

To say, “@Tuwix: Watching heavy metal concert is not my cup of tea” is to express that the person prefer not to watch it

“Bukan kesukaan/hobby?” – @dinikurniasih

“Does it mean he/she can not enjoy the match? Doesn’t like football?” – @Uliibaiik

“So, its like “reading novel is my cup of tea”?” – @santikaaz

Yep :)

So another way of translating “cup of tea” is something that you like. Hence, saying “not my cup of tea” (dislike) would be the opposite to saying “my cup of tea” (like). Another translation for “not my cup of tea” could be:

“not my type” – @RidhoRifhansyah

“Not for all the tea in China”

“Not for all the tea in China” is also another idiom related to “tea” the drink, but quite an old fashion one.” – @LiaSafi3

Not for all the tea in China” means not for anything at all or never, am I right?

“: Absolutely right :)” – @LiaSafi3

“Not for all the tea in China” was said to originate from Australia which “alludes to the presumed huge quantity of tea in China.” So, an example would be

  • “No, I will not sell my bicycle, not for all the tea in China.”

Storm in a teacup

And here is another idiom related to “tea”

“I think it is all a storm in a teacup” – @akhyar927

I think it is all a storm in a teacup” means “I think these are all small problems exaggerated“, am I right @akhyar927?

“Exactly! You are completely right!” – @akhyar927

A storm in a teacup” is the British English idiom while “Tempest in a teapot” is the American English idiom.

Di dalam bahasa Indonesia, “a storm in a teacup” bisa disamakan dengan “berlebihan” atau “lebay” dalam konteks suatu masalah/kejadian kecil yang dibesar2kan.

Contoh:

  • “Perkelahian mereka lebay.” (“Their fight was a storm in a teacup”)

So we have “not my cup of tea,” “my cup of tea,” “not for all the tea in China,” and “a storm in a teacup.” It’s interesting how “tea” becomes such idioms, right?

Usually “a storm in a teacup” is more for an event rather than a character. Sadly this is it for today’s #IOTW :) I hope it has been useful and inspires you to learn English :)

Thank you for everyone’s contribution and hope you all enjoyed it :)

“Of course I enjoyed it. Thank you :)” – @puputputreey

Source:

Compiled and written by @daedonghae at @EnglishTips4u on Saturday, January 31, 2015


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2 responses to “#IOTW: Idioms related to ‘tea’

  1. Pingback: #IOTW: Idioms related to food | @EnglishTips4U·

  2. Pingback: #IOTW: Idioms Related To Food and Drink | @EnglishTips4U·

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