#EngTrivia: Ways to say goodbye

We often say “Goodbye” or “Bye” before going. It is one of the most formal ways to say goodbye to someone. In reality, there are more ways to say goodbye.

In this post, we’ll talk about ways to say goodbye. Of course, some might only be appropriate in a certain situation and not other.

Have a nice day/evening/night” is usually said to someone that you’re not very close with (colleague, employee, friend of a friend).

Bye” is the most common way to say goodbye in English. You can say “Bye” to anyone you know, from friends to coworkers to clients.

Bye bye!” is more often said by (and to) little children. If it’s used by adults to adults, it can either sound childish or sometimes flirtatious.

I’ve got to get going” is a good expression to use when you’re ready to leave a social gathering. It is more polite than to suddenly say “bye” and leave in the middle of a conversation. Depending on the situation, you might also briefly explain why you’re leaving. In a casual situation, like speaking with a peer or a friend, you can shorten the expression to “Gotta get going”.

Later!” is a casual way to say goodbye. You often follow “Later!” with something like “man”, “bro”, “dude”, or “dear”.

See/Talk you later.” is not quite as casual as “Later!”. You can use it with almost anyone.

So long” isn’t very common for actually saying “goodbye” to someone, but you may find it sometimes in news headlines and other places.

Catch you later.” is a variation on “See you later”. The phrase is used in a very casual situation.

I’m out!” is connected with hip-hop. It’s something that you can say when you’re glad to be leaving. You can also say “I’m off!”

Compiled and written by @Miss_Qiak at @EnglishTips4U on Thursday,  November 13, 2014


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