#GrammarTrivia: Verb + Preposition (‘About’ and ‘Of’)

This time, I’d like to talk about grammar. In particular, we’ll talk about: Verb + Preposition (‘About’ and ‘Of’).

Some verbs can be followed by either ‘about’ or ‘of.’ Each pairing usually gives different meaning from the other.

  1. ‘Dream about’ vs. ‘dream of’
    • Dream about. Example:
      • “I dreamt about you last night.” (when I was asleep).
    • Dream of being something. Meaning: imagine. Example:
      • “I dream of being rich.”
  2. ‘Hear about’ vs. ‘Hear of’
    • Hear about. Meaning: be told about something. Example:
      • “Did you hear about the fight club last night?”
    • Hear of. Meaning: know that somebody/something exists. Example:
      • “I have never heard of Tom Madley. Who is he?”
  3. ‘Remind about’ vs. ‘Remind of’
    • Remind somebody about. Meaning: tell somebody not to forget. Example:
      • “I’m glad you remind me about the meeting.”
    • Remind somebody of. Meaning: cause somebody to remember. Example:
      • “This house reminds me of my childhood.”
  4. ‘Complain about’ vs. ‘Complain of’
    • Complain (to somebody) about. Meaning: say that you are not satisfied. Example:
      • “We complained to the manager about the service.
    • Complain of a pain, illness, etc. Meaning: say that you have a pain. Example:
      • “George was complaining of a pain in his stomach.”
  5. ‘Warn about’ vs. ‘Warn of’
    • Warn somebody of/about a danger. Example:
      • “Everybody has been warned of/about the dangers of smoking.”
    • Warn somebody about something dangerous, unusual, etc. Example:
      • “Vicky warned us about the traffic.”

Source:

  • English Grammar in Use (Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press).

 

Compiled by @aditriasmara at @EnglishTips4U on Monday, October 13, 2014

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^MQ

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2 responses to “#GrammarTrivia: Verb + Preposition (‘About’ and ‘Of’)

  1. Pingback: #GrammarTrivia: Contraction | @EnglishTips4U·

  2. Pingback: #GrammarTrivia: Verb + Preposition (‘With,’ ‘to,’ and ‘on’) | @EnglishTips4U·

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