#EngClass: English Common Mistakes (3)

  1. When ‘wait’ is followed by an indirect project, we have to use the preposition ‘for.’ It should be “wait for somethingnot “wait something.”
    • Example:
      • “I waited for the postman but he never came.”
  2. ‘Inform’ must have a direct object. It should be “inform someone about/of something.”
    • Example:
      • “I’m writing to inform you that I’m leaving,” not “I’m writing to inform that I’m leaving.”
  3. ‘Attend’ means to go to an event/place etc and it’s never followed by ‘to.’
    • It should be:
      • attend an event/place,” notattend to an event/place.”
  4. ‘Could’ is followed by an infinitive verb without ‘to.’
    • You should say:
      • could do something,” notcould to do something.”
  5. ‘Discuss’ is never followed by ‘about.’
    • It should be:
      • “We need to discuss our project,” not “We need to discuss about our project.”
  6. When ‘participate’ is followed by a direct object, always use the preposition ‘in.’
    • Example:
      • “Nia participates in a lot of English competitions.”
  7. When ‘provide’ is followed by an indirect object, always use the preposition ‘with.’
    • Example:
      • “Could you provide us with a list of hotels?”
  8. When ‘search’ has an indirect preposition, use the preposition ‘for.’
    • Example:
      • “Henry is still searching for his lost keys.”
  9. ‘Seek’ is not followed by a preposition.
    • Example:
      • “I went to the beach seeking inspiration.”
  10. ‘Succeed’ is usually followed by the preposition “in.
    • Example:
      • “I hope you’ll succeed in your new job.”

 

Compiled and written by @iisumarni at @EnglisTips4U on Thusrday, November 15, 2012

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3 responses to “#EngClass: English Common Mistakes (3)

  1. Pingback: #EngClass: Common mistakes in English (2) | @EnglishTips4U·

  2. Pingback: #EngTrivia: Common mistakes and confusing words in English (3) | @EnglishTips4U·

  3. Pingback: #EngClass: Common mistakes in English | @EnglishTips4U·

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